top of page

Overview of Sending Church Element 17: Influencing Other Churches

A sending church influences other churches when it pursues relationships with like-minded and/or neighboring churches who haven’t matured in sending. The church thus multiplies its sending capacity by sharing experiences and resources with other churches, possibly even leading to strategic partnerships. - Upstream Collective Sending Church Element #17


The missions leader role can be a lonely one. Most every church in town has a lead pastor, a worship leader, youth leader, secretary, someone in charge of kids ministry, etc. But churches do not often have a paid missions leader with the capacity to really focus on the task of sending. It’s more likely in the average church that missions would be 1/10th of the youth pastor’s job.


As your church walks through all the elements, we hope this has an incredible impact on your church. And when you have been given this blessing, it becomes something you now need to steward well. As God works through your church, how might He be wanting to take what you are learning and implementing in your church and help others to do this as well?


"As God works through your church, how might He be wanting to take what you are learning and implementing in your church and help others to do this as well?"

Certainly one of the ways you can influence other churches is by passing on resources to them and recommending conferences and cohorts that they can be a part of to become a better Sending Church. We hope that one of the ways you could influence other churches is by encouraging them to participate in one of Upstream’s Cohorts! But you can have a direct impact on other churches that you have a relationship with as well. Consider a few of these ways:

  • Share your partnerships with other churches. There are few partners overseas that do not want relationships with more churches. Consider ways that you can do trips with other churches in your city and support Sent-Ones together.

  • Consider a regular missions leader prayer and encouragement meeting. Many mid to large sized cities have missions leaders that are at least part-time. Gather them together monthly for prayer, encouragement, and trouble-shooting.

  • Do a missions class that is for multiple churches in your city. Maybe there are some churches that couldn’t host a 4-week missions class or a Perspectives class. How could you do so?

  • Tell other missions leaders about Upstream’s Cohorts. This is a bit of a shameless plug, but we believe the cohorts provide the necessary tools to help a missions leader develop their church into a great sending church. Your recommendation will be a blessing to them!


God has blessed you and with that blessing there is the opportunity and responsibility to pass that on to others so that the universal Church becomes better at sending. As you begin to live out the first sixteen elements of being a great Sending Church, turn around and pass that on to other churches.


Upstream is here to help you Influence Other Churches. Here are a few ways:

  • A subscription to the resources on our website gives you access to practical ideas for Influencing Other Churches. Resources include:

“Regular prayer meetings in your city for missions leaders”


“Practical ways to influence other churches”

  • Our book, Sending Church Applied (Fall 2021), will take a deeper dive into how to Influence Other Churches.

  • The Advanced Cohort will give extensive training and personalized coaching to help you Influence Other Churches.


 

Mike Easton is the International Program Manager for Reliant Mission. Prior to that Mike was the Missions Pastor at Cornerstone Church in Ames, Iowa, for eight years, where he got to experience the ins and outs of being a sending church. He served on staff with Cornerstone 2006 to 2022 in varying roles–from college ministry to pastoral staff to being an overseas missionary sent from Cornerstone for two years. Mike is the Director of Content for the Upstream Collective. Mike, his wife, Emily, and their four kids continue to live in Ames, IA, and serve at Cornerstone.

Comments


bottom of page